cross-connect:

Artist Loren Stump specializes in a form of glasswork called murrine, where rods of glass are melted together and then sliced to reveal elaborate patterns and forms. While the murrina process appeared in the Mideast some 4,000 years ago, Stump has perfected his own technique over the past 35 years to the point where he can now layer entire portraits and paintings in glass before slicing them to see the final results.

Posted to Cross Connect by Sunil

(Source: crossconnectmag, via npr)

vizual-statistix:

Remember college? Or, if you are in college, remember Friday night? You may have played the classic drinking game, King’s Cup. For those who have never played it, it’s fun for N-1 of the N people participating. That one person for whom it isn’t fun has to drink a mixture of the other beverages being consumed. Depending on the potent potables involved, it can be remarkably unpleasant. The concept of this curious concoction got me thinking about an interesting question: What would this drink comprise if hundreds of random cocktails contributed? In other words, what is the average cocktail?
Using Paul Knorr’s Big Bad-Ass Book of Cocktails, I extracted the ingredient list of all 1,500 recipes. I then summed the main components, which are in units of parts, and divided by 1,500 to get the average composition. I’ve graphed the top 20 ingredients, which comprise the majority of the drink, in the form of a cocktail normalized to 100 parts. The remaining 46.6% of the drink contains hundreds of ingredients – every liquor you can think of, plus a variety of other liquids and foods. I’m dubbing this average cocktail the Teetotaler’s Terror. In addition to the average cocktail, I calculated the top five splashes added to drinks and the top five garnishes; these values are shown as percentages of all cocktails. Finally, I’ve graphed how drinks are most commonly served. Straight up in this context means a drink that is shaken with ice to chill it, then strained and served without ice. The “other” category includes blended cocktails, as well as those that are served hot or at room temperature.
Data source:
http://www.amazon.com/Big-Bad-Ass-Book-Cocktails-Recipes-ebook/dp/B0035YDM7G/

vizual-statistix:

Remember college? Or, if you are in college, remember Friday night? You may have played the classic drinking game, King’s Cup. For those who have never played it, it’s fun for N-1 of the N people participating. That one person for whom it isn’t fun has to drink a mixture of the other beverages being consumed. Depending on the potent potables involved, it can be remarkably unpleasant. The concept of this curious concoction got me thinking about an interesting question: What would this drink comprise if hundreds of random cocktails contributed? In other words, what is the average cocktail?

Using Paul Knorr’s Big Bad-Ass Book of Cocktails, I extracted the ingredient list of all 1,500 recipes. I then summed the main components, which are in units of parts, and divided by 1,500 to get the average composition. I’ve graphed the top 20 ingredients, which comprise the majority of the drink, in the form of a cocktail normalized to 100 parts. The remaining 46.6% of the drink contains hundreds of ingredients – every liquor you can think of, plus a variety of other liquids and foods. I’m dubbing this average cocktail the Teetotaler’s Terror. In addition to the average cocktail, I calculated the top five splashes added to drinks and the top five garnishes; these values are shown as percentages of all cocktails. Finally, I’ve graphed how drinks are most commonly served. Straight up in this context means a drink that is shaken with ice to chill it, then strained and served without ice. The “other” category includes blended cocktails, as well as those that are served hot or at room temperature.

Data source:

http://www.amazon.com/Big-Bad-Ass-Book-Cocktails-Recipes-ebook/dp/B0035YDM7G/

(Source: metalhearted, via disgustinganimals)

greenwichpips:

 L’ecole des Femmes

saving this for later.

(via ferrousfellow)

hereastori:

 

by Norwegian conceptual artist Rune Guneriussen

(Source: red-lipstick, via ferrousfellow)

(Source: disgustinganimals)

geometrymatters:

Complex works of the Venezuelan artist Rafael Araujo

http://www.rafael-araujo.com/calculo_ing.html

disgustinganimals:

What is this, a zoo for ants?

disgustinganimals:

What is this, a zoo for ants?

(Source: catleecious)

uinyan:

「ねこむらおたこ」さんのTwitterのつぶやきをついに商品化!「にゃんこ型イヤホンジャックカバー作ってみた」 | ニコニコショッピング(仮)

infinity-imagined:

Coccolithophores are single celled eukaryotic phytoplankton that synthesize intricate exoskeletons from crystals of calcium carbonate.  The functions of these coccoliths are unknown, and may include buoyancy, osmotic regulation, protection from UV light, predation, or mechanical shock.  When nutrient and light conditions are optimal, coccolithophores can form massive plankton blooms that are visible from space.  Large numbers of these organisms can accumulate on the ocean floor forming chalk deposits such as the White Cliffs of Dover

(Source: ina.tmsoc.org, via geometrymatters)

(Source: mikikoponczeck, via ferrousfellow)

thefutureisbroken:

cute4cheap:

Stocking Lot on Amazon

$7.94-$8.68 (price depends on choice)

Again, several people who’d be missing out if I didn’t reblog these.

(via ferrousfellow)